Study describes HPV vaccination rates among adolescent males

1. In U.S. adolescent males, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake of ≥1 dose and series completion of ≥3 doses were 34.6% and 13.9%, respectively, with significantly higher rates of completion among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, compared with non-Hispanic whites.

2. The most common reason reported by parents for not vaccinating their male adolescents was the perception that the provider did not recommend it.

Evidence Rating Level: 2 (Good)       

Study Rundown: Vaccination is an important way to prevent HPV infection, which is the most common sexually-transmitted infection in both men and women in the U.S. and can cause anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers in males. In 2011, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) for males aged 11 and 12 and those aged 13 to 21 who have not yet completed the 3-dose series. Previous studies have shown limited, early uptake of HPV vaccination in male adolescents: 1.4% in 2010 and 8.3% in 2011. Authors of the present study sought to assess more recent data on HPV vaccination uptake in male adolescents, as well as identify reasons for not receiving vaccination. They analyzed data from the 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen), a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Results indicated that HPV vaccination uptake of ≥1 dose and series completion of ≥3 doses were 34.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Rates of series completion were significantly higher among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, compared with non-Hispanic whites. Lower levels of HPV vaccination coverage were found among those who had mothers with at least a high school education, had mothers of age ≥45 years, had an income to poverty ratio >133%, were living in the Midwest or South, and were receiving vaccinations from all STD/school/teen clinics. The most common reason reported by parents for not vaccinating their sons was the perception that the provider did not recommend it. Limitations include low household response rates, with only half of respondents having adequate provider-verified vaccination data. Nonetheless, these findings may encourage provders to recommend the HPV vaccine to male patients as well as females and educate parents on the benefits of vaccination.

Click to read the study, published today in Pediatrics

Relevant Reading: HPV prophylactic vaccines and the potential prevention of noncervical cancers in both men and women.

In-Depth [survey]: Participants included 9554 male adolescents, aged 13 to 17 years, from the 2013 NIS-Teen sampling plan of households with a landline and cell phone. HPV vaccination uptake of ≥1 dose and series completion of ≥3 doses were 34.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Series completion was significantly higher among non-Hispanic blacks (15.7%) and Hispanics (20.3%), compared with non-Hispanic whites (11.1%, p < .05 for all). Multivariate logistic regression showed that high levels of HPV vaccination coverage were found among those who: had mothers who were never married, widowed, divorced, or separated; those born outside the U.S.; were eligible for Vaccines for Children (VFC) but not uninsured or with state children’s health insurance; had 2 or 3 physician contacts in the past 12 months; had a well-child visit at age 11 to 12 years; had 1 or 2 vaccination providers; and lived in urban or suburban areas (p < .05). Lower levels of HPV vaccination coverage were found among those who: had mothers with high school or more than high school education; had mothers of age ≥45 years; had an income to poverty ratio >133%; were living in the Midwest or South; and were receiving vaccinations from all STD/school/teen clinics. The most common reasons reported by parents for not vaccinating their sons was the belief that the provider did not recommend it (24.0%), that it was not needed or not necessary (18.9%), lack of knowledge (16.4%), the adolescent was not sexually active (8.1%), and safety or side effect concerns (7.3%).

Image: PD

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